Twitter Employee Reviews about "upper management"

Updated Mar 5, 2020

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Found 18 of over 1,389 reviews

4.2
85%
Recommend to a Friend
93%
Approve of CEO
Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey
Jack Dorsey
615 Ratings
Pros
  • "Great work life balance & great team(in 90 reviews)

  • "Smart people, very good technology(in 62 reviews)

  • Cons
  • "Remote/work-at-home has made work/life balance even worse than it was before covid(in 27 reviews)

  • "Open for a monthly schedule or even weekly to be able to meet with upper management on the direction of the corporation(in 18 reviews)

  • More Pros and Cons
    Pros & Cons are excerpts from user reviews. They are not authored by Glassdoor.

    Reviews about "upper management"

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    1. 4.0
      Current Employee, more than 10 years

      Great team and only getting better.

      Mar 5, 2020 - Sole Proprietor in Greetland, England
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Good support and great understanding of how to move forward.

      Cons

      Hard to communicate with., Open for a monthly schedule or even weekly to be able to meet with upper management on the direction of the corporation.

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    2. 2.0
      Former Contractor, less than 1 year

      Twitter is not what it seems

      Apr 16, 2019 - Program Coordinator in Newmarket, ON
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Initially, it seems like a campus, everyone is pretty young, there compensation is good, theres Great food and the interns were fun to talk to.

      Cons

      Although, the pros are tangible, the cons and intangible and hard to fix -Poor communication with management -No room for growth -Not enough inclusivity and diversity -A lot of mismanagement with upper management

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    3. 2.0
      Former Employee

      Great people, terrible management

      Mar 30, 2018 - Anonymous Employee in Charlotte, NC
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      The cafeteria is fantastic. Delicious, plenty of variety, lots of healthy options. The kitchenettes throughout the building are great, too: thoughtful setup, good snack variety, plenty of drinks, and excellently maintained. The office space is very well designed. Good lighting, spacious layout, and lots of little nooks for when you want to get away from your desk. Ergonomic furniture, including standing desk setups, is easily available. Location is very commute-friendly. Corporate IT is shockingly good. On your first day you get a laptop that's perfectly set up. Network coverage is excellent everywhere. Video conferencing works reliably. Problems are rare and resolved quickly by friendly, competent support staff. Colleagues are generally smart, friendly, and pleasant to work with. They almost all love and care about the product they work on. Compensation is competitive, with a twice-yearly raise cycle, and benefits are solid. It's great to work at a company with such a prominent, meaningful product. If you can get something done at Twitter (which is by no means guaranteed) you can have enormous impact.

      Cons

      The management is implausibly bad. The CEO, Jack, is good at the "company figurehead" part of his role. But he simultaneously runs another large tech company, Square, meaning he runs Twitter in his spare time. He has 20-odd direct reports and no time to supervise them, so the executive level appears to be Lord of the Flies. That upper-management chaos of course trickles down. Everybody has a story of working hard for months on a project only to have it canceled at the last minute due to executive infighting, high-level turnover, or pure fickleness. Reorgs and emergencies are too frequent and frequently ineffective. The chaos also allows bad execs to thrive. Particularly terrible was Ed Ho, who runs the entire consumer-focused side of the company and can be seen in the news promoting Twitter with claims that, from the inside, appear at best stretched. Polite but cold in public, he's a dismissive, controlling jerk in private. He talks a good game about collaboration, but in practice he is widely know as a "my way or the highway" guy, forcing out dedicated, experienced contributors. He has steadily climbed the ranks, making it ever harder for people with different views or approaches to find ways to stay at Twitter. This managerial mess of course ends up creating technical messes. Twitter's feature velocity is much slower than comparable software shops due to extensive technical debt. Frequent priority changes leave plenty of junk behind in the code base. Engineers with promotion ambitions know that they'll be rewarded more for creating fancy new technology than doing mop-and-bucket work, making things worse. This drastically reduces the effectiveness of the many good engineers working there. One of my engineer colleagues said shipping software at Twitter was like "swimming in mud" compared with other companies they'd worked at. This was complimented and enabled by an HR organization that was at best unhelpful and lackadaisical. I understand that many large-company HR shops see themselves as there to help the company, not the workers. But even by that standard they were below average, eager to avoid engaging with anything. I know of at least one racial bias incident where they were very anxious to deny that there even could be a problem, suggesting without any investigation that it must be a misunderstanding. (Kudos, though to Blackbird, the African-American employee resource group, whose response was instant, vigorous, and appropriate.) Much of this might be forgivable if the organization were effective. But one of the striking things about Twitter is how little it gets done. Note, for example, that when a tweet gets popular, the tweeter will say something like "RIP my mentions!" The notifications interface, though, remains unchanged, useless at high volume. Or consider the lack of an ability to edit typos in tweets, an enormously popular request. Their big recent change is expanding tweets from 140 to 280 characters, hardly a technical miracle. And so many features get launched and then never touched. Compared with Facebook, which is continually tinkering and improving, Twitter gets so very little done. And few at Twitter even seem aware of the problem, let alone are willing to discuss it openly.

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      24 people found this review helpful
    4. 5.0
      Former Employee, more than 3 years

      Great place to start a career

      Sep 29, 2017 - Senior Software Engineer in San Francisco, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Great people Good tech Awesome product Good pay/perks

      Cons

      Upper management Lack of direction (sometimes)

      1 person found this review helpful
    5. 4.0
      Current Employee, less than 1 year

      opportunity to work on a well-known consumer product

      Jun 3, 2017 - Data Scientist in San Francisco, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      If you get a thrill from working on a recognizable product that's often in the news, then being at Twitter will provide you with a psychological boost. Strong engineers. Twitter is a frequent OSS contributor. So even though Twitter has a lot of in-house tools and runs its own data centers, you will still get the chance to work with tools that are probably used elsewhere. Good food and plentiful coffee. The company tries hard to be inclusive.

      Cons

      Location: mid-market is not the most convenient part of the city. I get the sense there is a lot of tech debt in the product, but a lot of effort has been made in the past year to pay it down to make future development easier. A lot of turnover in the revenue team's upper management ranks. Exec turnover is quite high, even though exec compensation is frequently in the news for being way too generous relative to the company's revenue level and growth rate.

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    6. 1.0
      Former Employee

      Twitter Finance

      Jun 6, 2017 - Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      - Twitter has an inspiring and an unparalleled product, and there is still so much unrecognized potential that I genuinely look forward to seeing unfold. I still love the product, the platform, and the greater Twitter ecosystem from employees to exec team to advertisers, and end-users. - Great benefits and work/life balance - Despite the criticism, I also think Jack is an amazing leader, and a human being.

      Cons

      I would recommend joining Twitter, but stay far, far away from the Finance team if you want to experience career growth. - Middle and upper management lacks strategic vision. - Favoritism and corporate politics is proudly displayed by management - Lack of career growth and promotion opportunities if you're not favored - Compensation is not competitive compared to the industry - Ineffective org structure - Some teams are much too bloated while others struggle to stay afloat. (Favorites get all the headcount) - Everything I mentioned in the pro section does not compensate for the cons when you feel your efforts are not valued.

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      7 people found this review helpful
    7. 2.0
      Former Employee, more than 3 years

      3.5 years wasted. Should have chosen a different company!

      Nov 27, 2016 - Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Like everywhere else, great colleagues you get to work with. Immediate managers were, for most part, great people as well - with varying degrees of greatness. Benefits were average. Equity package was unspectacular.

      Cons

      The biggest con is that this company has 0 loyalty to employees. They talk about people being one of the most important assets, but when it comes to real action, the upper management has zero sympathy for its employees. You're just a number. Go somewhere loyal, where the company actually cares about you. When they laid off people, they kicked them out the door like an old dog. Not even as much as a thank you. Upper management is a joke. Jack keeps sitting on two chairs. Easiest fix to stock troubles would be to resign from Square. Noto took a ridiculous amount of money when he joined. And they had the audacity to vest all his stock at once "just to help him move to SF". Disgusting. Too many good people left in the last 1-1.5 years. The trend will continue - they will keep bleeding talent. Some people go *back* to the companies they left to join Twitter - how bad is that??!? Save yourself the trouble, go somewhere else.

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      19 people found this review helpful
    8. 3.0
      Former Employee, more than 3 years

      Way too political

      Mar 21, 2016 - Senior Software Engineer in San Francisco, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Lots of good engineers and interesting problems. Most of the engineers are really nice and are easy to work with. They are trying to get their technical stack together.

      Cons

      High level positions experience little growth and end up dealing with overly political upper management. Promotions are almost impossible, especially if you came in through an acquisition.

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      7 people found this review helpful
    9. 4.0
      Former Employee

      Great people

      Mar 3, 2016 -  
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Benefits are great People are lovely

      Cons

      Upper management constantly changing plans and ideas. Poor leadership.

      1 person found this review helpful
    10. 4.0
      Current Employee

      Senior Engineer

      Feb 2, 2016 -  in San Francisco, CA
      Recommend
      CEO Approval
      Business Outlook

      Pros

      Perks and Food and Product

      Cons

      Upper management needs to be more consistent

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