Texas Instruments Employee Reviews about "upper management"

Updated 11 Jul 2020

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4.1
84%
Recommend to a Friend
94%
Approve of CEO
Texas Instruments Chairman, President, and CEO Rich Templeton
Rich Templeton
1,660 Ratings
Pros
Cons
  • "Always under constant stress and worries upper management will come down at you for every little thing(in 45 reviews)

  • "Analog centered (difficult for digital oriented people)(in 41 reviews)

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Reviews about "upper management"

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  1. Helpful (1)

    "Pays well but very bureaucratic and corporate"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Marketing Manager in Tucson, AZ
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Texas Instruments full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Great coworkers, good pay, well developed product portfolio

    Cons

    Draconian emphasis on burdensome processes, upper management abstraction from what’s really going on, promotion of folks who toe the line rather than think independently

  2. "Get rid of team politics"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Analog/Mixed Signal Test Engineer in Bangalore
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Texas Instruments full-time

    Pros

    Good research happening, good compensation, great employee recognition, good training program.

    Cons

    Too much team politics, poor upper management, randomly assigns job roles to new college grads without knowing their strenghts and interests, does not encourage rotation program in all teams for new employees.


  3. Helpful (6)

    "Only intern here. Gaslighting, breadcrumb culture."

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Product Marketing Engineer in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at Texas Instruments full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    You will have a great experience as an intern and rotator and possibly for the first year or so after your deploy to your full-time role. When I started, we had a 2-week orientation and really got to bond with both PME and Sales rotators. That bond is something that made TI feel like a family to me and not just a place to work. (They've since gotten rid of that culture) My peers were and still are some of my best friends. There's lots of growth in corporate behavior, work ethic, communication skills, and presentation skills that can transfer well to other companies. The PME role allows for domestic and international travel (unless they cut that out too now), which is fun but a lot of work. They have a lot of training opportunities that are of no cost to the employee that many employees do not take advantage of. I highly recommend taking these courses, even if that means taking a day from work to do so. The only jobs I recommend at TI are HR and Digital Marketing.

    Cons

    PAY / PROMOTIONS / WORK-LIFE BALANCE Starting pay is great but over the years, the raises are not competitive. They pay you less and work you more than other companies. I have not heard of a single person unhappy with their decision to leave TI. The culture of the managers is to make you feel like you should be GRATEFUL for the breadcrumb raises and to not even ask for more. They make you believe that the typical annual inflation raise (that every other company offers) is a merit-based raise. It's actually very, very difficult to get a true raise, bonus, or RSU. They don't openly talk about the fact that there even is such a thing as a mid-year raise to be considered for. Other companies give you shares when you start, an annual inflation raise, AND a true merit-based raise. And other companies have a better work-life balance. TI will say they do, but when you start working 10-14 hour days, you'll understand it's just words. This gaslighting behavior is one of the biggest reasons I left and never want to go back. It's a toxic culture. Managers across the board have fallen short on promises made to employees whether they're raises, bonuses, RSUs, or promotions. Promotion methods are very unclear. While there are some great managers, there are a good number of bad managers that seem to be in that position because they're pals with upper management. Even when many, many people leave TI or leave the group to escape that manager, that doesn't register with HR or they don't care. This is not a good place for upward mobility. TECHNOLOGY TI is not longer an innovative company. They're never going to be at the forefront of technology. They're followers and it's not that exciting. ROTATION PROGRAMS The rotation programs were one of the biggest reasons I recommended joining TI but now they've cut so much from the programs that you don't get the benefits from them. They seem to play the role of temps during their rotation: cheap labor to do menial tasks that product lines don't have the time to do. If you get a good manager, you'll learn and grow a lot. But most of the time, rotators are treated this way. Also they got rid of the pay bump you get when you deploy to your full-time role. SALES / FIELD ROLES They're turning the TSR role more into a data-entry role and the FAE is taking on both responsibilities. I do not recommend joining TI if you want to go into a TSR or FAE role. PRODUCT MARKETING ENGINEER This is a made-up role by TI (or maybe ADI, who pays more) that combines the responsibilities of a Business Development Manager and a Product Marketing Manager while paying you one salary for 2 roles. It's also difficult to translate this role to other companies. Most other companies have never heard of a "Product Marketing Engineer". While this role is fun with strategy and all the travel, it doesn't help a lot with becoming an expect as a BDM or as a PMM. It may not be a great move for your career unless you want to stay with TI. TI knows they're the main company to be at in Dallas as a EE and they treat their employees accordingly.

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  4. Helpful (3)

    "Great Company with Great Benefits - But Beware of Manufacturing"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Process and Equipment Engineer in Richardson, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Texas Instruments full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Bring a process and equipment engineer in Manufacturing has taught me a lot of technical skills that will forever stay with me. You will learn how to be creative and how the semiconductor industry works.

    Cons

    Manufacturing work life balance is hell. You will be on call 24/7 and trust me you will get called. Manufacturing doesn’t take care of their employees well. Always under constant stress and worries upper management will come down at you for every little thing. It’s also not very motivating seeing the IT and business department having parties, free food, better deal, etc every week while your manufacturing engineers just watch and work all the time.

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  5. "Applications Engineering"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Applications Engineer in San Jose, CA
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Texas Instruments full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Great Resources and the chance to work with highly intelligent and driven individuals

    Cons

    I worked in the Sunnyvale Sales office which has a terrible culture. Being that it is sales, colleagues are quick highlight any negative observations/judgments they have on you to upper management. Upper management has their own agenda and is not transparent with their team on decisions being made.

  6. Helpful (5)

    "No innovation / Absence of technical talents."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Engineer in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Texas Instruments full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    1) Decent pay if you are based in Dallas or Tucson 2) Good work/life balance

    Cons

    1) If you are based in Santa Clara, you get paid much much less than all other companies near you. 2) No innovation. still stuck in 130nm / 90nm technologies in 2017 while the digital companies are pushing beyond 7nm - 5nm. 3) Upper management is mostly from sales / marketing. Hard to come by technically strong leaders. 4) Mostly hire from 2-3 tier schools that nobody knows about. - NVIDIA, Apple, Qualcomm, Google, Facebook are filled with Stanford/ Berkeley grads. I never ran into top school graduates at this company. Likewise, upper management filled with morons from nobody schools - rank 100 or below. 5) You don't get to work on cool technologies. you will work with old lifers who's lived in Dallas since the 70's and 60's. Doesn't feel young and innovative. 6) All the upper management cares about is cost reduction and sales. No long-term visions for innovation.

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  7. "Basic Contract Work Expierence"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Technical Writer in Dallas, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I worked at Texas Instruments for more than a year

    Pros

    Location and work environment was top notch. My coworkers were great too.

    Cons

    Seemingly infinite tiers of upper management kept everyone out of the loop until deadlines were encroaching. Standard large company fallback.

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  8. Helpful (2)

    "Conservative, steady company which lacks an innovative spirit"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Systems Engineer in Dallas, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Texas Instruments full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    * TI's greatest asset is its people. * Very large company, enabling a curious mind to dabble in a number of different areas over the course of a career. * Solid compensation and benefits * Finally getting serious about renovating the campus.

    Cons

    * Since it's the only major semiconductor company in North Texas, a lot of people stick around for decades. They are called lifers. This prevents young, ambitious talent from growing into leadership roles. Not all lifers are bad. A lot have great ideas and a wealth of knowledge. But, there are some lifers that are dead weight and need to be removed to make way for fresh ideas. * Politics and Bureaucracy. It's a big company, so it comes with the territory. But, the combination of the two tends to stifle innovative and creative ideas from ever taking root. * "Old Boy Network": some of the lifers mentioned above have escaped layoffs and have landed cushy roles via the network. They always seem to be one step ahead of strategic shifts and the fallout that ensues. Governing philosophy of these types is to hire capable people below them to do all the work, which frees them up to travel the globe on the company's dime. * Lack of Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking. Upper management is dominated by sales and marketing types. Primarily a formulaic, sales-driven approach to things, which is odd for a historically innovative technology company. Not enough engineering thought leaders in upper management, which leads to a lack of inspirational engineering leadership throughout the company.

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  9. Helpful (3)

    "Engineering Manager"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Engineering Manager in Sherman, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No Opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Texas Instruments for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Good company to gain technical skills, but not longevity.

    Cons

    Company has a historical record of unethical practices within upper management

  10. Helpful (6)

    "Ratings in Decline - No Longer People Oriented"

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Texas Instruments for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Decent financial management and the business direction right now is pretty solid. There is profit sharing for all employes. For a portion of my career there we had managers and executives that understood that they should value employees - and employees would do good work. We were encouraged and supported in taking calculated risks to make big improvements. It was exciting and rewarding work.

    Cons

    In the last 5 years the organization I worked for became vertically stacked with too many levels and every one of them only looked up for input. The "yes" people were promoted and no one cared for, or valued, input from employees or the technical staff. You just feel like a cog in the wheel now - don't have ideas, just come in and do what we say. They actually demoted an employee who gave an internal scientific talk on climate change because "management doesn't believe in climate change." TI used to be open door company, but managers became insistent on you not talking to upper management directly - even to provide them valuable information to inform their decisions.

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Found 45 reviews