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Vodafone Diversity And Inclusion FAQ

Read what Vodafone employees think about diversity and inclusion at the company, and if their workforce is comprised and supportive of individuals of varying gender, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, religion and other attributes.

Vodafone has a diversity rating of 4.2.

All answers shown come directly from Vodafone Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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3 English questions out of 3

29 September 2021

Does there seem to be diversity at Vodafone?

Pros

Vodafone Global Enterprise has a brilliant client base, which allows for excellent exposure to a wide array of industries. Great organisation to gain experience for a couple of years.

Cons

Newbury, as a location can be challenging. You really need a car to get there, as the train to Newbury is only every 30 minutes. The pay is poor compared to other industries, given the complexities of the role. There was a distinct lack of diversity in senior management a few years back, resulting in managers giving greater opportunities to those of a similar ilk. However, I believe they has been improvement in this area recently. From a commercial management perspective they were diabolical, whereby the focus was on winning new business with little regard to the commercials.

Advice to Management

Focus on quality over quantity.

There was a distinct lack of diversity in senior management a few years back, resulting in managers giving greater opportunities to those of a similar ilk.

29 September 2021

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24 August 2021

Does Vodafone provide assistance to those with physical or mental disabilitiies?

Pros

- International work environment with lots of ambitious, fun and talented colleagues - Development opportunities such as options to take courses on an internal training platform, mentorship program (although very hard to get a mentor)

Cons

Without a question, there are many talented people at Vois. But as the unofficial saying between employees goes: "Your experience at Vodafone depends on your team". Unfortunately, my department turned out to be the living proof that "a fish rots from the head down". What happens when you have leads and managers who validate their intelligence by making others feel inferior and scared by using their hierarchical position and performance evaluation (appraisal/promotion) as a retaliation technique? They push people to leave even if they love what they're doing. When leadership turns a blind eye towards people being treated unfairly rather than punishing such actions, it sends a message to everyone that this is acceptable, and becomes part of the company culture. When employees are labeled as "toxic, negative and problematic" for speaking up against misconduct or micro-aggression, it's creating a fear-based workplace. Even worse, attempts to hold somebody accountable for their behavior are treated with gaslighting, telling you that your perception of what happened is wrong. Forget psychological safety to be yourself, voicing your opinion or asking questions that might differ from your lead's perspective if you ever dream about being promoted or get recognised for your contributions in the performance cycle. Unless you're a master manipulator, shameless self-promoter or do everything to "be your LEAD'S/MANAGERS'S biggest fan", you might be disappointed with the outcome. Feedback is highly encouraged, but it's actually effective only one way. Even if you try to provide your manager constructive feedback, it will either be forgotten, used against you later, or dismissed altogether (this applies to both, one-on-one feedback, as well as facilitated and documented with an external team). Ironically, managers/leads also love talking about the importance of mental health, but some think it's about smiling more, being positive and just being grateful that you still have a job. Teams were even told in a public forum to write positive and grateful comments, and not what they actually think, in the internal survey tool that is designed to provide an honest picture about team health. Every constructive comment was therefore automatically labeled as "toxic" - leadership just wanted to hear happy thoughts and words of gratitude. And if you do take up the courage and share about your struggles, you run a high chance of being gaslighted, psychologically invalidated, or being blamed for it and this will not be loudly said, you will see that in action. Everything that makes your managers uncomfortable needs to be silenced and covered up with toxic positivity. Also, if you have a choice to be anything for Vodafone - Take the business side (Product owner) or Scrum master, not an employee. POs and Scrum Masters are brought in without much skills and on high rates and even if they just end up recycling existing ideas from the team and presenting them back to the lead - They will be praised and celebrated more than the employees who provided all the groundwork and expertise. My advice to everyone before applying or accepting a job at Vodafone: Don't trust the interview process alone, do your own research. If your future team members are not included in the interview process (always a major red flag!), reach out to current or past team members on Linkedln and ask about their experience. If you see several job ads for the same team popping one after the other, ask what has caused all the positions to become open out of a sudden. If you notice the same job ad circulating for months or being constantly changed, ask why and don't accept dismissive or surface-level answers. This is your career and you deserve to make an informed decision whether or not this is the place for you. It's in your own best interest to do proper due diligence to be aware if you will join a supportive and friendly work environment, or an ego-centric political minefield that will end up leaving you worse off than when you joined.

Advice to Management

Please put more effort and resources into creating a transparent and fair 360 degree performance evaluation process. This has been a major pain point for employees for several years, resulting in high attrition rates and overall dissatisfaction around the evaluation cycle rounds. Unfortunately, not every manager at Vodafone has their directs' best interests in mind, resulting in a heavily subjective (sometimes frankly dishonest) outcome based on your relationship and their sentiment towards you. Don't give managers all the power, employees should have more control in a process that directly affects their career instead of being blindsided. Next, finally address your leadership problem. Currently, Leads and Managers are given a lot of responsibility and power with limited support and proper accountability. Just because somebody is positioned hierarchically slightly higher than others, doesn't mean that they cannot make mistakes and psychologically abuse their directs to the point that people seek out mental health support, are in constant fear or making a mistake or actually decide to leave altogether. Poor leadership has direct consequences on employees as well as Vodafone's business future. It's a vicious cycle: Losing not only the reputation as an employer, but also a lot of money because of high attrition rate and having to rehire and onboard new employees who also won't stay too long unless the root problem has been dealt with. In a nutshell, put more focus on P&O topics (leadership, evaluation, recognition, rewards, competitive pay, discrimination cases etc.) that cause your employees to leave Vodafone. Most people actually really love what they do, but if they are straight-up treated unfairly, they won't stick around for long. Talented experts like that will be picked up in a heartbeat by your competitors, so maybe some measures need to be taken instead of waiting for teams to fall apart.

When leadership turns a blind eye towards people being treated unfairly rather than punishing such actions, it sends a message to everyone that this is acceptable, and becomes part of the company culture.

24 August 2021

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26 May 2021

How is race or ethnicity talked about at Vodafone?

Pros

Company benefits such as sick pay, care leave, compassionate leave, maternity & paternity leave, decent salary

Cons

Not much on culture or values, in my department around 95% white management and not much diversity

Not much on culture or values, in my department around 95% white management and not much diversity

26 May 2021

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3 English questions out of 3

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