Boots Opticians Senior Leadership FAQ

Read what Boots Opticians employees think about senior leadership and the CEO at the company.

Boots Opticians has a Senior Management rating of 3.5, and James Arrow , the CEO of Boots Opticians, has an approval rating of 77% across the organisation.

All answers shown come directly from Boots Opticians Reviews and are not edited or altered.

How are senior leaders perceived at Boots Opticians?

9 English reviews out of 9

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8 April 2021

Pros

Staff discount is good. Most of the people you work with are friendly.

Cons

The company is very indecisive with decisions, they will tell you to do one thing and then change their mind a few days later. The pay is very poor for what is expected. Awful computor system. Sales targets are ridiculous for a pandemic and staff are blamed by upper management for people not wanted to book an appointment. Next to no opportunity to progress.

Advice to Management

Store management and area management is good. Head office needs a huge re-work with people who actually understand the industry. Overtime is expected due to staff shortages. You will be made to travel to stores that are very far from your base store.

Sales targets are ridiculous for a pandemic and staff are blamed by upper management for people not wanted to book an appointment.

8 April 2021

Reviewed by: Optical Consultant (Current Employee)

4 December 2020

Pros

Great team miss the people

Cons

Too mays secrets kept by upper management

Too mays secrets kept by upper management

4 December 2020

Reviewed by: Optical Consultant in Sheffield, England, England (Former Employee)

8 April 2021

Pros

Senior leadership team are genuinely engaged and engaging. James Arrow (MD) and his team regularly holds video conference meetings with all practice managers, and doesn't shy away from answering difficult questions thoughtfully and meaningfully. Although the answers are usually, we can't afford to invest in that, it isn't a priority, or it's on the roadmap within the next five years (and has been for the last fifteen), the honesty is appreciated. Reasonable work life balance, although taking on more stores and more responsibility has changed that, it is still better than many other retail/optics management roles. Can switch off emails and ignore calls on holiday without repercussions, and little to no contact after normal business hours outside of genuine business emergency.

Cons

Very disordered, in the next couple of years Boots Opticians needs to either rapidly shape up, or they will be facing the end. Senior leadership do seem to know what their problem areas are, but seem unwilling or unable to face into them. Customers complain that we're too expensive and our prices are too confusing, so they reduced the price of some of the lenses, increased the price of others as well as most of the frames and added an extra tier into the pricing, making the end result more expensive and more confusing! Technology across the business is hugely out of date, we're still using paper records like it's 1993! The stock keeping system is ancient and unreliable, nobody (even loss experts) understands how it works. The PMS is a dangerously buggy mess that will bring up incorrect patient data, lose appointments and orders (literally every patient is has a duplicate file due to a mistake someone made about a year ago that nobody can work out how to fix!). The recall system was broken for around a year, with reminders sent randomly to the wrong patients and they either couldn't invest or couldn't work out how to fix it. The intranet is a broken joke where searching brings random results and half the links are broken. IT is outsourced as cheap as possible, so when issues come up (all the time), you are going to spend half an hour on hold, to some poor guy who speaks little to no English, and just needs to close the call as fast as possible regardless of if your issue is fixed or not. So the business obviously invests into online rota's that don't talk to the (outdated) payroll software and email accounts for OCs? Solving absolutely nobodies problems. Lack of critical maintenance points to a worrying cash flow problem in the business as a whole. Shops themselves, barring a few flagships, are uniformly shabby. Broken windows, leaking ceilings and damaged fixtures take months to be fixed, if at all. I've had parts of my store held together with duct tape for several months until maintenance can afford a fix. Critical testing kit is left out of commission, costing the business a fortune in lost revenue, for want of replacement parts. You're expected to deliver a premium product and service on a shoestring budget, with none of the tools or processes to deliver that. And when the half-baked processes inevitably fall down across the business, it isn't the fault of Nottingham where the processes were written, or the lack of investment has come from - it is individual practice managers and their teams who get it in the neck. Area management seems disordered and/or disinterested. Some good leaders are moved on or demoted, while others who seem utterly useless persist and are promoted beyond any logic.

Advice to Management

Face into the issues that make a difference to our patients and staff. If investment costs are tight, invest them into where they will make the most differnece, and for goodness sake get rid of OPS (the PMS)!

Senior leadership team are genuinely engaged and engaging.

8 April 2021

Reviewed by: Clinical Practice Manager in Manchester, England, England (Current Employee)

20 January 2021

Pros

I worked with a lovely team who had years of experience and very much enjoyed optics and the new things I was learning each day. There was good discounts on boots products and 70% off prescription glasses/sunglasses if you needed it. The sick leave and maternity pay was good. In general we had lots of good choices for frames and lens’ with customers. I really enjoyed the job when I first started as it felt like we really cared about people’s well-being.

Cons

Towards the end of my time here during the pandemic when they decided not to bring managers back into store, optical assistants were being overworked and underpaid; being expected to do a store managers job for zero pay increase this led to incredible stress and a day where my entire team cried because of how overwhelmed they was. Upper management were constantly making changes to the prices and procedures without consulting their staff on the ground which led to things that were not beneficial to the customer or the staff which clearly someone sat in an office who had no experience of optics had designed. Lack of training meant there was many who could do one thing but not another and it led to a high turnover of staff as they felt inadequate when they couldn’t do things that they could if they had just had some training. The wage for the job you was doing was very small and actually one of the lower paying of opticians. No bonuses or commission made it feel as if it wasn’t worth it. The uniform was one of the worst things about the company, cheap polyester uniform that was constantly splitting or tearing and once it did break you could be waiting months before getting a new set. A customer once described it to me as looking militant and I couldn’t disagree with them. In my time there plenty of staff left but non were replaced which meant at times you had three people for three clinics and as soon as you had a walk in it meant everyone was rushing around without being able to give proper attention to the customer. The rule of being stood up all day meant that we looked as if we was doing nothing when customers walked in when actually we had ten jobs in hand that we couldn’t deal with just so we looked as if we were ready to go for the next customer. If there is jobs going at any other opticians I would go there over boots, their work politics gets to be too much and you feel very inferior within the company; there is zero room for progression at most points but especially now as they are making staffing cuts.

Advice to Management

Speak to the people who are doing the job in the store to see what they think is needed rather than making cuts at head office and promoting useless offers. Hire people who have an understanding of optics in your main offices. Don’t pay thousands in bonuses to the big managers when your staff are struggling on the ground. Know your demographic when wasting money on buying bizarre and eccentric frames. Know that the business model as it is at the moment is definitely not working and speak to your staff as to why that is.

Upper management were constantly making changes to the prices and procedures without consulting their staff on the ground which led to things that were not beneficial to the customer or the staff which clearly someone sat in an office who had no experience of optics had designed.

20 January 2021

Reviewed by: Optical Assistant in London, England, England (Former Employee)

1 January 2021

Pros

Great team, interesting work and nice customers

Cons

Awful senior leadership, don’t listen to employees

Awful senior leadership, don’t listen to employees

1 January 2021

Reviewed by: Optical Consultant (Former Employee)

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9 English reviews out of 9