Compare GEICO vs AT&T BETA

See how working at GEICO vs. AT&T compares on a variety of workplace factors. By comparing employers on employee ratings, salaries, reviews, pros/cons, job openings and more, you'll feel one step ahead of the rest. All salaries and reviews are posted by employees working at GEICO vs. AT&T. Learn more about each company and apply to jobs near you.
GEICO company icon

GEICO

AT&T company icon

AT&T

Employee Ratings

  • GEICO scored higher in 3 areas: Career Opportunities, CEO Approval and Positive Business Outlook.
  • AT&T scored higher in 3 areas: Overall Rating, Work-life balance and % Recommend to a friend.
  • Both tied in 3 areas: Compensation & Benefits, Senior Management and Culture & Values.
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
3.4
(based on 5742 reviews)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
3.7
(based on 27588 reviews)
AT&T employees rated their Overall Rating 0.3 higher than GEICO employees rated theirs.
Career Opportunities
Career Opportunities
3.7
GEICO employees rated their Career Opportunities 0.3 higher than AT&T employees rated theirs.
Career Opportunities
3.4
Compensation & Benefits
Compensation & Benefits
4.0
Compensation & Benefits
4.0
Work-life balance
Work-life balance
3.0
Work-life balance
3.2
Senior Management
Senior Management
3.1
Senior Management
3.1
Culture & Values
Culture & Values
3.4
Culture & Values
3.4
CEO Approval
CEO Approval
GEICO Ceo Todd Combs
81%
81%Todd Combs
GEICO employees rated their CEO Approval 18% higher than AT&T employees rated theirs.
CEO Approval
AT&T Ceo John Stankey
63%
63%John Stankey
% Recommend to a friend
% Recommend to a friend
56%
% Recommend to a friend
64%
AT&T employees rated their % Recommend to a friend 7% higher than GEICO employees rated theirs.
Positive Business Outlook
Positive Business Outlook
57%
GEICO employees rated their Positive Business Outlook 9% higher than AT&T employees rated theirs.
Positive Business Outlook
49%

Salaries

Salaries for similar jobs
There are no salaries matching this company.
Salaries for similar jobs
Technical Support Engineer2 Salaries
€50,870/yr
Office Administrator1 Salaries
€32,977/yr
Business Development Representative1 Salaries
€35,479/yr

What Employees Say

  • AT&T had 1,475 more reviews than GEICO that mentioned "Great benefits" as a Pro.
  • AT&T had 1,210 more reviews than GEICO that mentioned "Work life balance" as a Con.
Pros
Pros
"Profit sharing"(in 822 reviews)
"Great benefits"(in 509 reviews)
Pros
"Great benefits"(in 1984 reviews)
"Good pay"(in 1965 reviews)
Cons
Cons
"Work life balance"(in 240 reviews)
"Micro managed"(in 158 reviews)
Cons
"Work life balance"(in 1450 reviews)
"Upper management"(in 802 reviews)
Featured Review

Current Employee - Sales

I have been working at GEICO full-time for more than a year

Pros

I'm going to try to be as transparent as possible, so it doesn't come off like I'm a GEICO shill or something, but I've been working here for a couple of years and it has been literally life changing.... I took a small pay cut to go from another phone sales job to this one, mostly for the benefits and stability, but partly for the chance at chasing bonuses and drastically increasing my income. I am proof that the sales bonuses are completely achievable and, if anything, they pay me too much to sit on my butt and talk on the phone 40 hours a week. The atmosphere is 100% merit based; no politics that I've ever seen, years employed means little, virtually all rewards are based on clear and objective metrics with only a few exceptions I'll detail in the cons. This has the lowest turnover of any entry level job I've ever seen; of the 10 people in my training class, 7 are still with the company after 2 years. A couple have been promoted and a couple washed out of sales and went to Service. I have no particular interest in doing anything but "sitting at home and printing money" (as one of my sales supervisors/trainers once put it). If I did have managerial career aspirations, however, those possibilities are wide open to me; I've seen people who started less than a year ago get promoted into management based on merit and prior experience. When I was in the office, it was a bare-bones, no frills experience, and the break rooms were lacking, but big enough. The company sent us all home for COVID and, for the top performers, it's becoming permanent (more on that later in cons). WFH is amazing here - no cameras in the house required for us rank and file folk, thank god, and I never feel like a supervisor is breathing down my neck to make sure I'm working 100% of the time. Instead, they use clear metrics for phone time and availability. Breaks are more flexible than most call centers and shift work, but still more restrictive than other jobs. I've saved the best for last: the bonuses, oh my god, the bonuses. I feel like if I say how much I'm making out loud, I'll wake up. This is a six-figure entry level sales job, if you can hit the numbers, and there is a non trivial percentage of the sales staff that hits bonus every month. You can literally double your base income with bonuses - and the bases are already pretty darn good, more per hour than I've ever made in my life, anyway. This is not a commission job and the minimum quotas you have to meet are trivial, so you can decide for yourself how high you want to set your sights. The rewards are proportional to your effort and skill. If you want to coast in the low-priority queue and have super long waits between calls, you can. If you want to hustle and spend every working second selling, you can. Mind you, don't expect to hit the high numbers right out of the gate; it's 6 months, bare minimum, before you can even qualify for the right licensing, appointments, training, and high-priority call queues. You prove yourself on the basics first and then the opportunity opens up. A high pressure, commission-based sales job will rake in the dough faster, but this is an appropriate tradeoff considering how easy and secure the job actually is. If you can't achieve the big numbers, you still have a stable, easy office job. If you can't even make the bare minimum, they'll just put you in a support department and you'll do fine there. One last pro for sales vs other departments; you are often times talking to people at some of the best times in their lives, like when they are buying a car or house. Other times, you help save people a ton of money when they need it the most. You rarely deal with distraught customers or give out bad news other than declining people (knowing they can just go somewhere else). Compare that to service, where everyone is calling to complain about rate increases, or claims - god help you - where every call is someone crying about how [redacted so this review isn't flagged], or having to crush someone's hopes by declining a claim because they didn't check the right box when they signed up online six years ago. Don't underestimate the psychological effect of claims/service and how it can lead to burnout. With Sales, you make people happy all day and get paid way too much money to do it.

Cons

The cons list is pretty short and mostly petty. The biggest con is that they've cancelled the global work from home and introduced a "flex work" schedule you can earn by being one of the absolute top... performers. This change is not scheduled to go in for a few months, so it could conceivably change, but as-is 95% or more of the workforce is going back into the office. Even regular bonusing agents aren't hitting the metrics they are putting out there. The "flex work" should focus a lot more on the flex. The software is quite terrible and embarrassing for such a big company. Department-wide shutdowns are commonly - as in weekly, everything goes down, stopping work until they fix the phones or the software or the VPN or whatever it was that broke this time. It's not just the WFH folks affected, either. Besides stability, the software is incredibly poorly designed and causes big headaches for the staff and customers, not to mention all the money and time wasted due to calls taking 2-3 times as long as they should. Even looking up a customer's account is difficult and sometimes impossible. Search for a homeowner's policy by address? I'm sorry, we don't have that kind of advanced technology at Geico. Even when it's not crashing, the software is slow and counterintuitive, with crucial information hidden or simply not displayed anywhere, and even something as simple as navigating to basic customer information screens is tedious and difficult - not to mention crash prone. The office itself is your usual dreary cubicle farm with 2 inches of space around your seat. Once COVID hit, the voluntary office people (i.e. people who just didn't want to work from home) enjoyed having their space, but once the WFH protocols end, we're going to be back to being packed in like sardines. The office computers are trash and, last I heard, they still only let you use one monitor at a time. That's bizarre. Ever since WFH started, I've used 3 monitors for efficiency. Hopefully this is changing soon, since the monitoring software they use for call recording has no problem capturing multiple screens. The breakrooms have nothing except overpriced vending stalls, microwaves, and uncomfortable chairs. This is a minor complaint, don't take it too seriously. I only bring it up because it's so jarring having a six figure job and a breakroom like a minimum wage grocery bagger. Most of the metrics are fair, but there is some scoring for "confidence" that doesn't make any sense. For example, if someone brings up a barrier that can't be broken ("I don't have any money and I don't want this insurance, I pressed the wrong button"), if you don't try to pressure them into buying at least once, you get marked down for not being "confident." It doesn't make any sense so don't try to overthink it. Little things like that; sometimes, they don't agree that your "ask for the sales" was enough of an ask, even if you succeed in selling it. Some supervisors will fight for you to overturn bad call scoring, especially in cases where you actually sell the policy, but some supervisors won't, so getting a good one is key. The training gives you a lot of bad procedural information and leaves you ill-equipped in some crucial areas. It covers the insurance portion well; you do learn your stuff, and you're prepared to answer customer questions immediately after training, but the keys to actually successfully sell policies and make good numbers are not taught in training. Instead, they teach you to memorize some rote procedures that you have to tick off in the call to not get scored down, but none of these procedures accomplish anything except wasting your time. They don't teach you anything about persuasion. Not a single word about "buying signals." Luckily I had a sales job before this one with a trainer who showed me ropes, but others aren't so lucky. Following the scripts and the on-screen application steps is self-defeating. You have to learn (or have someone tell you) how best to avoid or minimize the pitfalls taught to you in training and actually sell. I can try to give an example: there are crucial eligibility questions late in the application that can disqualify some customers. Even if you see some red flags right up front that someone might not qualify, you aren't allowed (according to training) to ask those questions until the computer tells you. So, you waste your time and the customer's time going through a whole app and presenting a premium that you aren't even allowed to sell them. Then, seconds before the payment screen, you get to the eligibility question and deny them. Thankfully, most supervisors will look the other way and (currently) you don't get scored down for asking relevant questions out of order, despite what they tell you in training. My supervisors have all been very accommodating here - maybe I've been lucky, or maybe all the supes have enough sales experience to know what works and what doesn't. I don't have any really serious cons because most of the stuff I listed above is a tiny blip compared to what I've seen at other, much lower paying jobs. I've had call center jobs where the call scorers had quotas to meet and would literally just make stuff up to hit quota, and the supes didn't care. I've had jobs where you get marked down for bad surveys that were mistakenly assigned to you, even if the caller specifically named a different person in the survey. I've even had worse breakrooms and more cramped spaces. I don't think I've ever had worse software, though. The basic sales software we use is not fit for any kind of enterprise-wide deployment.

Advice to Management

Make WFH flex plans available to anyone who meets basic qualifications, or set a bare minimum from WFH that is one or two steps higher than the office bare minimums. You shouldn't have to be in the... top 5% elite of sales to get to work from home. Completely throw out your entire software infrastructure and start over from scratch. I'm praying this has been underway for a few years in secret, but I seriously doubt it. I'm resigned to assume we are stuck with this horrid software forever. Once we move to a bigger office, a more respectable breakroom and cubicle or desk space is a must. Successful sales speak for themselves - if I'm making my numbers, I should be able to take the training wheels off, as long as I'm not being unethical or making insurance-related errors. If I don't want to sell to a customer who has no money, I should be able to end the call and get another one.

Former Intern - Technology Development Program

I worked at AT&T

Pros

Worked as a front end developer and learned Angular, very cool people to work with and had an intern challenge the whole summer that had to do with AR and VR

Cons

I have no cons from my internship

Job Postings

AT&T has 7,119 more recently posted open jobs than GEICO.